Category Archives: Team Building

Culture Chris Ruisi Team Productivity

Culture: The Key to Your Team’s Productivity

One of the keys to having a productive team is to create a work culture that possesses a clear vision; one built on strong values and demonstrates that you, the leader, genuinely care. Let’s talk about the “caring” part. To show your team that you care for them demands that you focus on “what makes them tick” as people, both individually and collectively. After all, they are people who are on your team.

Try these 5 simple actions for starters: Continue reading

Peter Drucker Chris Ruisi

It’s All About The People

Peter Drucker is universally known as the “father of management theory.” After his death in 2005, Businessweek magazine called his work “a blueprint for every thinking leader.”

Over the last 6 months, I have spent a significant amount of time re-acquainting myself with his work. I had first read many of his works while I was growing in my career at USLIFE.

From this recent review, I learned or re-learned many things. However, two of his statements were very interesting to me. They were:

“Executives spend more time on managing people and making people decisions than on anything else – and they should. No other decisions are so long lasting in their consequences and so difficult to unmake.”

“Of all the decisions an executive makes, none are as important as the decisions about people because they determine the performance capacity of the organization. Therefore, one should better make sure that these decisions are made well.”

So how important are these two concepts? Consider the following: Continue reading

Bad Team Chris Ruisi

Loose Lips Sink Ships

About a week ago I made a call to a financial planner whom I know who works here in Middletown, New Jersey. Several years ago, I had a brief coaching assignment with him.

The reason for my call was to refer an individual to him, who I thought, would be a good potential client for his business.

As expected, his assistant answered the phone. I introduced myself and asked if I could speak with the gentleman. She put me on hold and after 10 or15 seconds, came back and said, “I’m sorry he’s in a meeting right now. Can I take a message and have him call you back?” I responded that it would be very nice, and gave her my name and the best contact number for him to use.

Then, as expected, she asked, “May I tell him what this call is about?” I responded that I would prefer to discuss it with him when he called me back. She did not like my response, her tone changed and she became a bit frustrated with me because I wouldn’t comply with her request.

Now, in all fairness to the lady, she probably thought that I was one of those annoying telephone solicitation calls that we all get. Continue reading

Job Descriptions Chris Ruisi

Dump Your Job Descriptions

It’s time to forget about the traditional type of job descriptions we use in business today.

In my opinion, the typical job description is a very static document that is used only once in either employment or in training of a team member. In most cases, it is shown to the individual once and then forgotten about until something goes wrong, and we waive it at them stating, “You didn’t do your job.” Very few of you (if any) come to work each day and decide to update your job descriptions. So deal with it—in its current format it’s useless!

What I suggest to my clients is that when they are ready to define a job, they do it in two steps.

First, create a statement of the “essence” of the role in which you define specifically:

  • Why the job exists;
  • What you expect in terms of a result or outcome from it;
  • How that outcome “contributes” to your company’s performance and growth; and,
  • How the company and its customers benefit from having this position.

From the answers to these questions, we make the document more relevant to the job at hand by identifying what the company is trying to accomplish in both the short- and long-term.

Plus, it shows the employee very clearly where and how they can contribute, and where they can make a difference. When this occurs, you increase the chances of the employee becoming engaged and focusing on doing the right things at the right time on a consistent basis.

After you’ve created this “essence” statement, you’re in a better position to create a list of both the strategic and tactical job duties for the position that support this opening statement. You would identify the top 8 to 10 key tasks that you want the person in the role to perform. Not only does this help the individual understand the scope of their responsibilities and accountabilities.

In addition to the above, if you define a position in the way in which I am suggesting, you have a better chance of developing a meaningful training plan for that individual which would include specific measurable items that can be tracked.

What’s the next step? Write your own “essence” statement. You might be surprised to learn what you are supposed to be doing.

 

What Questions Chris Ruisi

What?

“What” is a very simple word, yet when used correctly can be a leader’s most effective and powerful tool. Why? Because it helps the leader get information they need to make the best decisions possible for their business, their team and their customers.

Effective leadership means knowing how to ask the right question at the right time in the right way to determine the status of your organization and to make sure your team is on the right track to accomplish its stated goals. Far too many “wanna be” leaders ask questions after the fact and generally – when things go wrong – in a confrontational way.

Here are some simple questions, using “what” that you can employ to help you effectively lead your team and help them grow and perform better. Continue reading

Delegation Chris Ruisi

The Art of Delegation

Wikipedia tells us that “delegation” is the assignment of authority and responsibility to another person to carry out specific activities. The person who delegated the work, however, remains accountable for the outcome of that work. Delegation is supposed to empower a subordinate to learn and to make decisions. It is a shift of decision-making authority from one organizational level to a lower one. Continue reading

Chris Ruisi Giving Constructive Feedback

Giving Constructive Feedback

The other day, while I was conducting a leadership workshop for entrepreneurs, one of the attendees asked the best way to give constructive feedback—especially when negative performance issues are being addressed.

In responding to the question, I counseled the person that first they needed to be clear on their purpose for giving the feedback. What the consequences were to them, their company and the employee if the issues were not addressed; and what specific actions they wanted to address and/or correct.

With that information shared as a backdrop, I suggested that the person take these specific actions when they met with their employee/team member: Continue reading

Chris Ruisi Team Communication

Do Your Team Members Talk to Each Other?

If your company is like most others, your team members talk to each other – about work (mostly complaining about it, or your customers or even you), their families, weekend activities – but mostly the usual “stuff” people talk about. These types of conversations will always exist and no matter how repetitive they may be, they will never go away, nor should they.

The type of talking I want to discuss today is very different and may even be taking place in your organization, but I’ll bet not to the extent it should if you want to truly tap into the power of your team. Continue reading

Team Building Chris Ruisi

Finding Your Team’s Greatness

Those of us in a leadership position, all want to run/lead a successful operation. However, many are just not doing the right things at the right time to achieve that goal. We get very good at complaining and blaming, but eventually realize that nothing good comes from that.

The success of your company hinges on many factors. Some of these factors you can control, while there are others that you have to react to. One of the most important factors of success – that you can control completely – is your team. Specifically, how you help your team members find, develop and properly use their greatness. Continue reading