Tag Archives: boosting team performance

Job Descriptions Chris Ruisi

Dump Your Job Descriptions

It’s time to forget about the traditional type of job descriptions we use in business today.

In my opinion, the typical job description is a very static document that is used only once in either employment or in training of a team member. In most cases, it is shown to the individual once and then forgotten about until something goes wrong, and we waive it at them stating, “You didn’t do your job.” Very few of you (if any) come to work each day and decide to update your job descriptions. So deal with it—in its current format it’s useless!

What I suggest to my clients is that when they are ready to define a job, they do it in two steps.

First, create a statement of the “essence” of the role in which you define specifically:

  • Why the job exists;
  • What you expect in terms of a result or outcome from it;
  • How that outcome “contributes” to your company’s performance and growth; and,
  • How the company and its customers benefit from having this position.

From the answers to these questions, we make the document more relevant to the job at hand by identifying what the company is trying to accomplish in both the short- and long-term.

Plus, it shows the employee very clearly where and how they can contribute, and where they can make a difference. When this occurs, you increase the chances of the employee becoming engaged and focusing on doing the right things at the right time on a consistent basis.

After you’ve created this “essence” statement, you’re in a better position to create a list of both the strategic and tactical job duties for the position that support this opening statement. You would identify the top 8 to 10 key tasks that you want the person in the role to perform. Not only does this help the individual understand the scope of their responsibilities and accountabilities.

In addition to the above, if you define a position in the way in which I am suggesting, you have a better chance of developing a meaningful training plan for that individual which would include specific measurable items that can be tracked.

What’s the next step? Write your own “essence” statement. You might be surprised to learn what you are supposed to be doing.

 

What Questions Chris Ruisi

What?

“What” is a very simple word, yet when used correctly can be a leader’s most effective and powerful tool. Why? Because it helps the leader get information they need to make the best decisions possible for their business, their team and their customers.

Effective leadership means knowing how to ask the right question at the right time in the right way to determine the status of your organization and to make sure your team is on the right track to accomplish its stated goals. Far too many “wanna be” leaders ask questions after the fact and generally – when things go wrong – in a confrontational way.

Here are some simple questions, using “what” that you can employ to help you effectively lead your team and help them grow and perform better. Continue reading

Delegation Chris Ruisi

The Art of Delegation

Wikipedia tells us that “delegation” is the assignment of authority and responsibility to another person to carry out specific activities. The person who delegated the work, however, remains accountable for the outcome of that work. Delegation is supposed to empower a subordinate to learn and to make decisions. It is a shift of decision-making authority from one organizational level to a lower one. Continue reading

Delegating Chris Ruisi

Effective Delegation Made Easy in 6 Simple Steps

Wikipedia tells us that, “Delegation is the assignment of authority and responsibility to another person to carry out specific activities. The person who delegated the work still remains accountable for the outcome of that work. Delegation is supposed to empower a subordinate to learn and to make decisions.”

Poor delegation causes frustration and confusion to all of the parties involved. Or, to say it another way: When done poorly, “It can be a living hell!” It also cheats your team out of opportunities to develop their skills, which ultimately hurts you, your team and your organization.

So how do you get started on the road to becoming an effective delegator?  First and foremost, you’re going to have to break out of your comfort zone and be willing to change. After that, following these simple 6 steps will get you going in the right direction: Continue reading

Chris Ruisi Leadership

Having Fun is a Key Leadership Role

All of us in a leadership position get to carry the brunt of the problems and challenges we face every day. We sometimes cause these problems. And in other cases, we must clean up the mess made by someone else.

In most cases, we serve as the “buffer” between the problems and our teams. Then once we have confronted the problem we have to sift through the emotion and clutter that comes with it to determine what caused it and more importantly how to solve it—while still doing everything else you’re supposed to do!

Working through and managing bad days comes with the territory if you are a leader. But, when the number of those bad days starts to take place on an ever increasing basis and the severity intensifies, you’re then experiencing days that “you don’t want to go to work.”

However, as a good leader you pick yourself up and go to work on those days you really don’t want to be there. You fool yourself into thinking that “it’s what you have to do” but, you’re not having any fun

When you reach this state, it’s time to come to a complete stop and put yourself in time out! You need to give yourself some time to catch your breath and think about what you’re doing versus what you “should” be doing. Why? Because if you don’t stop the madness, you’ll “burn out physically and emotionally, and run yourself and your business into the ground—permanently.

With the possibility of the demise of your business staring you in the face, you should consider taking all of these key steps: Continue reading

Chris Ruisi Giving Constructive Feedback

Giving Constructive Feedback

The other day, while I was conducting a leadership workshop for entrepreneurs, one of the attendees asked the best way to give constructive feedback—especially when negative performance issues are being addressed.

In responding to the question, I counseled the person that first they needed to be clear on their purpose for giving the feedback. What the consequences were to them, their company and the employee if the issues were not addressed; and what specific actions they wanted to address and/or correct.

With that information shared as a backdrop, I suggested that the person take these specific actions when they met with their employee/team member: Continue reading

Delegate - Chris Ruisi

What Stuff am I Thinking About this Week?

From my coaching and mentoring experiences, one of the biggest challenges those who aspire to be leaders consistently face is how to improve their productivity by delegating tasks to other team members. Many do it wrong and eventually throw their hands up in frustration and end up doing the work themselves and then…complain about it.

So the “stuff” I’m thinking about this week (and you should be also) is how to become effective when delegating to others. Think – and more importantly act – on these key delegation points this week:

  • Poor delegation creates frustration and confusion, destroying any effort on your part to be productive. Train others to do the tasks that take you away from more important things. A team that can’t develop their skills fully will ultimately hurt your business.
  • Delegation, when done the right way, is one of the most effective tools that successful leaders have. If you can live with the worst possible outcome, then you can delegate the project.
  • When delegating, choose someone who has exhibited the right work ethic and attitude.
  • When delegating, be sure to describe the task as clearly and as simply as possible. Invite and encourage questions and feedback.
  • When delegating, set clearly defined expectations along with a target completion date.
  • When delegating, don’t turn your back on the project just because you think you’ve delegated it. Periodically check in to see how they are doing and whether or not they need your assistance.

 

Chris Ruisi Team Communication

Do Your Team Members Talk to Each Other?

If your company is like most others, your team members talk to each other – about work (mostly complaining about it, or your customers or even you), their families, weekend activities – but mostly the usual “stuff” people talk about. These types of conversations will always exist and no matter how repetitive they may be, they will never go away, nor should they.

The type of talking I want to discuss today is very different and may even be taking place in your organization, but I’ll bet not to the extent it should if you want to truly tap into the power of your team. Continue reading