Tag Archives: boosting team performance

Success Habits: Developing Teams

One thing that’s common to most business owners is that they have a team. It’s one of the most important aspects of a successful business. How do you develop a team that’s prepared to align your business for success? Chris shares his tips on setting the proper expectations, a useful tool in the training, development and education of your team.

3 Guaranteed Ways to Hire the Wrong People

Chris Ruisi Driving Business Growth PodcastIt’s amazing how everyone agrees that the quality of your team will determine the quality of your business. Yet many still approach the hiring and selection of employees as a burden or something you “have to do.” Well, you have to do it! And you had better be doing it right if you want to avoid mistakes, lost money and productivity, and cause your customers to go elsewhere. Listen in as Chris goes over these 3 critical points – but only if you want to create a great team that delivers great results.

 

 

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Chris Ruisi Enemy is Us

We Have Met the Enemy and He Is Us

The phrase, “We have met the enemy and he is us,” found it’s origin during the War of 1812 in which Commodore Perry reported, “We have met the enemy and they are ours,” to William Henry Harrison after the Battle of Lake Erie.

Cartoonist Walt Kelly, modified Commodore Perry’s quote to, “We have met the enemy and he is us,” in a cartoon he created in 1970 celebrating the first Earth Day in 1970. The message being that man – from his treatment of the earth – is the planet’s enemy.

In business, many spend a great deal of time focusing on, and even obsessing over, what their competition – their perceived “enemy” – may be doing to steal customers and market share. They fear that the competition will enter their space, and provide service and products equal to or better than what they are providing. This fear consumes them and their every waking moment. Yet, there is very little, if anything, one can do to influence or control what the competition will or will not do. Continue reading

Consistency: A Building Block of Leadership

Chris Ruisi Driving Business Growth Podcast

It’s a known fact, that consistency builds trust, and trust is one of the key attributes that a leader must have. Leaders need to constantly demonstrate to their teams that they can be trusted. When people trust someone, they tend to listen to that person and are willing to follow them. Acting in a consistent manner on several fronts is one if the best ways a leader can earn this trust. Listen to Chris today as he reviews these critical leadership action steps.

 

 

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Chris Ruisi Team

It’s Your Team!

The success of any company is directly related to the quality of their team. As such, it stands to reason that you should be investing time and money in the training of your team to deliver the product and service – and experience – that you desire and, more importantly, that your customer desires.

Now, when I talk about training I’m also including that the team member is “proficient” in the task for which they were given the training. Far too many of you consider just showing a person how to perform a task is all the training they need. Without measuring their proficiency, you’re just wasting time and money. And, in my opinion, proficiency includes that they know not only the “what, when and how” but why they do it, who they do it for and where it all fits into the total picture of your business. Continue reading

No Excuse Culture Chris Ruisi

6 Ways to Create a “No Excuse” Culture Within Your Organization

“Yeah Right!?” That’s what I sometimes hear from certain business leaders when I talk about creating a “no excuse” culture within their organization. I’m then “reminded” that excuses are part of the game and you just have to accept them. From my perspective, accepting that “excuse making” comes with the territory is, well…an excuse not to take action!

Effective leaders know that building and sustaining a “no excuse” culture can be done – not overnight – but as a result of the combination of several distinct (but related) tactics. These tactics include: Continue reading

Innovate or Stagnate

Innovation vs stagnation: legacy thinking – that is, sticking with the status quo – and how it applies to growing your business. What happens if you never innovate? Listen to what Chris has to say…

Job Descriptions Chris Ruisi

Dump Your Job Descriptions

It’s time to forget about the traditional type of job descriptions we use in business today.

In my opinion, the typical job description is a very static document that is used only once in either employment or in training of a team member. In most cases, it is shown to the individual once and then forgotten about until something goes wrong, and we waive it at them stating, “You didn’t do your job.” Very few of you (if any) come to work each day and decide to update your job descriptions. So deal with it—in its current format it’s useless!

What I suggest to my clients is that when they are ready to define a job, they do it in two steps.

First, create a statement of the “essence” of the role in which you define specifically:

  • Why the job exists;
  • What you expect in terms of a result or outcome from it;
  • How that outcome “contributes” to your company’s performance and growth; and,
  • How the company and its customers benefit from having this position.

From the answers to these questions, we make the document more relevant to the job at hand by identifying what the company is trying to accomplish in both the short- and long-term.

Plus, it shows the employee very clearly where and how they can contribute, and where they can make a difference. When this occurs, you increase the chances of the employee becoming engaged and focusing on doing the right things at the right time on a consistent basis.

After you’ve created this “essence” statement, you’re in a better position to create a list of both the strategic and tactical job duties for the position that support this opening statement. You would identify the top 8 to 10 key tasks that you want the person in the role to perform. Not only does this help the individual understand the scope of their responsibilities and accountabilities.

In addition to the above, if you define a position in the way in which I am suggesting, you have a better chance of developing a meaningful training plan for that individual which would include specific measurable items that can be tracked.

What’s the next step? Write your own “essence” statement. You might be surprised to learn what you are supposed to be doing.