Category Archives: Human Resources

Are You Developing Your Team?

Almost daily, we read that with our improving economy and full employment, there are more open jobs than there are people to fill them. Hence, the retention of your best performers becomes a key management concern and objective for 2019 and beyond.

One of the best ways I know to retain your talent is to continue to develop them, so they grow – and achieve personal satisfaction – as your company grows.

Chris Ruisi-Learning StoolNow, some of you may be saying, “Well, we train our employees.” Stop thinking about training your team and make the mental shift to those activities that will “develop” them. To me, when people talk about training, they are often describing an event or meeting. On the other hand, when you focus on development, you are taking a more permanent and longer perspective to help “develop” and use the right behaviors versus a one-time event or class.

There needs to be three key components when you want to effectively develop your team to produce at a higher level on a more consistent basis.

This visual of a 3-legged stool will help you in understanding how these concepts work.

 

Here’s further information to help you understand the three components necessary to make your development activities successful:

  1. In line with what I stated above, the good performer employee must be given the opportunity to learn or acquire the new skill or knowledge.
  2. Next, they must be given the opportunity to apply the new skill or knowledge to their current role. Get them using the new skill as soon as possible. Discuss how you will want them to apply it even before they acquire it to help them focus on the goal you have set for them.
  3. Finally, they must be given the opportunity to receive feedback – constructive and meaningful feedback – from you on how they are doing in applying that new skill or knowledge. Providing your team member with the right feedback will help them learn their new skill faster and give them more self-confidence.

I cannot think of a legitimate reason why you wouldn’t follow this approach. Unless of course, you prefer mediocrity and disengaged employees.

 

Chris Ruisi Behavior

Attitude vs. Skill: It’s All in the Behavior

As more and more people find employment during this growing economy it is creating a burden for employers trying to fill open positions. Highly and even moderately skilled workers are being hired at a rapid pace creating a challenge for all employers trying to fill their open positions.

Part of the solution for this challenge is for employers to willingly relax their skills requirements and begin to place greater emphasis on a candidate’s attitude. A rule of thumb which I have always followed simply states that you can always teach someone the required skills for a job, but you can’t teach them the right attitude. Hence, if forced to choose, I would always take attitude over skills.

In order to properly evaluate a candidate’s attitude, the interviewer needs to use more of a behavioral style of interviewing versus asking the typical questions that most of us use. In a behavioral interview, you are attempting to evaluate how the candidate will respond in different types of scenarios like working with other team members, handling problems, handling less than happy customers, avoiding conflict in the workplace and many other situations. All of this puts a big spotlight on the questions asked and how you prepare for the interview.

However, as I will explain, using a behavior-driven interviewing style is probably a good thing and something you should be doing more of regardless of the “hot” employment environment we are currently experiencing. Continue reading

Job Descriptions Chris Ruisi

Dump Your Job Descriptions

It’s time to forget about the traditional type of job descriptions we use in business today.

In my opinion, the typical job description is a very static document that is used only once in either employment or in training of a team member. In most cases, it is shown to the individual once and then forgotten about until something goes wrong, and we waive it at them stating, “You didn’t do your job.” Very few of you (if any) come to work each day and decide to update your job descriptions. So deal with it—in its current format it’s useless!

What I suggest to my clients is that when they are ready to define a job, they do it in two steps.

First, create a statement of the “essence” of the role in which you define specifically:

  • Why the job exists;
  • What you expect in terms of a result or outcome from it;
  • How that outcome “contributes” to your company’s performance and growth; and,
  • How the company and its customers benefit from having this position.

From the answers to these questions, we make the document more relevant to the job at hand by identifying what the company is trying to accomplish in both the short- and long-term.

Plus, it shows the employee very clearly where and how they can contribute, and where they can make a difference. When this occurs, you increase the chances of the employee becoming engaged and focusing on doing the right things at the right time on a consistent basis.

After you’ve created this “essence” statement, you’re in a better position to create a list of both the strategic and tactical job duties for the position that support this opening statement. You would identify the top 8 to 10 key tasks that you want the person in the role to perform. Not only does this help the individual understand the scope of their responsibilities and accountabilities.

In addition to the above, if you define a position in the way in which I am suggesting, you have a better chance of developing a meaningful training plan for that individual which would include specific measurable items that can be tracked.

What’s the next step? Write your own “essence” statement. You might be surprised to learn what you are supposed to be doing.

 

Chris Ruisi Giving Constructive Feedback

Giving Constructive Feedback

The other day, while I was conducting a leadership workshop for entrepreneurs, one of the attendees asked the best way to give constructive feedback—especially when negative performance issues are being addressed.

In responding to the question, I counseled the person that first they needed to be clear on their purpose for giving the feedback. What the consequences were to them, their company and the employee if the issues were not addressed; and what specific actions they wanted to address and/or correct.

With that information shared as a backdrop, I suggested that the person take these specific actions when they met with their employee/team member: Continue reading

How Do You Deal with Excuses?

Effective leaders know that building and sustaining a “no excuse” culture can be done – not overnight – but as a result of the combination of several distinct (yet related) tactics. These tactics include:

  • A clear and precise vision.
  • Real training, not the cheap imitation kind; communicate through words and actions that employee development is a key component of how you run your business/organization.
  • Provide consistent and comprehensive knowledge of job roles; teach people why what they do is important, where it fits in and then acknowledge it when they do it right.
  • Install real performance expectations and accountability standards.
  • Encourage positive feedback at all levels.

Seems unrealistic? Well, here’s something that is real: lost time and money. Stop for a minute and think about what mistakes and excuses (to cover up the mistakes or explain them away) are costing (lost sales, revenues and cash) your organization in terms of “do overs”, fixes, as well as the time it takes to navigate through the sea of excuses to get to the facts (aka truth).

And, while you are managing this, what’s the cost to your brand and reputation as your customers grow unhappy because they are the real victims of the excuses?

Still think that creating a “no excuse culture” is not doable and does not have real measurable value? Don’t even try to answer; it will only be an excuse.

 

Getting Your Team Engaged: Give Them A Vision

Ruisi-iTunes-1

 

Chris discusses the first of three key components to create a culture of employee engagement. Creating and implementing a vision to guide your team and organization.

 

Team Engagement from Chris Ruisi

 

Chris Ruisi’s “Step Up and Play Big Moments” is all about personal and business success. Chris’s goal is to offer today’s entrepreneurs, CEO’s and business leader’s practical guidance, tips, strategies and tactics that work in today’s challenging business climate. Chris brings his practical and successful experience at senior level management and Board positions to help his listeners cut through the clutter to Step Up and Play Big. Also available on iTunes.

 

 

3 Guaranteed Ways to Hire the Wrong People

I’m always amazed how everyone agrees that the quality of your team will determine the quality of your business. Yet many still approach the hiring and selection of employees as a burden or something you “have to do”. Well, you do have to do it! And you had better be doing it right if you want to avoid mistakes, lost money and productivity, and cause your customers to go elsewhere.

So here are 3 sure-fired ways to make certain that you continue to hire the wrong employees. Here’s the point (just in case you need to hear it): do the opposite! Continue reading

Taking it Slow Can be the Right Choice

One of my Weekly Mind Jolt episodes teaches those clients who invested in this product how to turn their team into a competitive advantage for their business.

Today, I want to talk about your team and the most important step you can, no… must take when hiring new team members.

Hire slow! That’s it. It’s simple, but critical, for you to adhere to this concept. There can be no excuse.

When you hire a new employee, you are not only filling a job. You are spending your money to hire a complete stranger to interact with your customers. That’s right, your customers – the people who spend their money in your business. Continue reading

Business Success Truths

We live in a fast paced, demanding, and competitive business world. We know that at times, action is better than overthinking an issue in order to either gain or maintain critically important momentum.

Here are five of what I call “Business Success Truths”. They are factual and to the point, and when adopted at the appropriate time will put you on a path to success. You can disagree with how they are written or the words I’ve selected if you want. But I don’t think you can disagree with the concept or message contained in them. Continue reading