Category Archives: Monday Morning Wake-Up Call

Do You Try or Do You Try?

The title as written is not a typo! It is meant to demonstrate that the word “try” can have two very different meanings and outcomes depending on how it is defined in your mind.

For example, on the “plus” side of the word try, is the recognition that to succeed at anything, one must take action towards a goal or outcome. Before we take the action, we go through a mental process evaluating what needs to be done and any risks associated with what we are planning to do. If it all makes sense, we start the process by “trying.” And this requires that we have a healthy mindset set evidenced by our courage and commitment to act. Also factored into this equation is our willingness to make a mistake and learn from it.

The other side of the word “try,” like Star Wars, has a “dark side.” Here, “try”… Continue reading

Chris Ruisi Trusted Leader

Consistency: The Path to Becoming a Trusted Leader

It’s a known fact that consistency builds trust and trust is one of the key attributes a leader must have. Leaders need to demonstrate consistently to their teams that they can be trusted. When people trust someone, they tend to listen to that person and are willing to follow them.

Let’s look at five simple “consistent” actions a leader can take to build their trust factor: Continue reading

Chris Ruisi on Failure

Are You 100% “All In” Every Day?

I find it interesting when someone says that they “know what they need to do.” You can almost see them patting themselves on the back for having recognized their need to act. Unfortunately, their recognition never turns into action and they continue to struggle with making the same mistakes, never progressing beyond their own self-imposed status quo.

Taking “knowing what you need to do” and translating that into specific actions is where many stall and fail. Why? Because they don’t realize that the required actions have as their foundation the clarity on what needs to be done; the self-discipline to actually do it; the persistence to work at it until they’ve succeeded; and the resilience to push through any barriers or obstacles they encounter. In other words, they lack the mindset to be 100% All In.

This 100% All In mindset allows you to take full control of your life or as I say to Step Up and Play Big and be the master of your circumstances. Here’s what a 100% All In mindset looks like: Continue reading

Chris Ruisi on Failure

Are You a Failure at Failure?

Failure is a fact of life. Failure happens. When it happens to you, you can lament about it and look to blame someone (other than you) or something. When you follow this approach, the next step is to throw up your hands in disgust and frustration, walk away and quit.

Or, you can make the conscious decision to take a step back, evaluate what happened and learn from the experience. And as you might suspect, this is the preferred action. In this regard, I stress a 4-step process that when things go wrong and you fail, you own it, fix it, learn from it and move on. And when you do fail, fail fast. I follow a simple rule: “Fail your failures fast,” so that you can get back on track and keep moving forward.

Taking a risk is the decision that sometimes leads to failure. To minimize the possibility of failure, learn to take calculated risks. Many of you have heard me say, “A turtle moves forward by sticking its neck out.” Continue reading

Chris Ruisi Success

Success

Much has been written about how one can achieve success. The vast majority of what is out there is very good. However, to be a success, in whatever you do, you have to start acting like you’re a success – now. I have yet to find a “success switch” that when flipped, one automatically is successful.

Despite what you might believe or have read, you can control the majority of your destiny. It all starts with making a choice; deciding what you want, and then taking the necessary steps to achieve your goal.

Before you go out and buy all the books and videos about success (and you should buy the right ones), start with these four simple but yet important actions to help you experience the essence of success and get you on the right path for the “journey”— Continue reading

Chris Ruisi Knowledge

Well, If You Ask Me…

As some of you may know, back in 2014-2015 I hosted a weekly “live” Internet radio show on Voice America. What follows are some of the key learning highlights from these shows. The learnings then from my great guests are just as valuable now as they were then—read, learn and apply. Continue reading

Chris Ruisi on Happiness

The Pursuit of Happiness

Our founding fathers said it best when they wrote:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all
Men are created equal, that they are endowed
By their Creator with certain unalienable rights
that among these are Life, Liberty
and the pursuit of happiness.

While the Declaration of Independence does not guarantee happiness, it makes it very clear that it is our job to pursue our happiness. Only we can make ourselves happy, and only we can see our dream and only we can live it.

But how does one “pursue happiness?” Consider the following: Continue reading

Leader Team Chris Ruisi

Stop Trying to Destroy Your Team

The single most important factor that will determine the success of your company is the quality of your team. Specifically, how you select, develop, utilize and measure them. To me, these four functions represent one of a leader’s key strategic responsibilities. Yet, many business leaders/entrepreneurs seem to go out of their way to self-sabotage their people efforts. How do they do this? Well, consider the following: Continue reading

Stephen and Jonah Ruisi

27 Outs: Lessons in Life by Guest Blogger, Stephen Ruisi

This week, I extended an invitation to my son, Stephen Ruisi to be my “guest blogger” and share with us an excerpt from a book he is writing about one of the most challenging experiences in his life. In this piece – written for his son – he uses the “27 Outs” in a baseball game to help his son build a path for a successful and meaningful life. Read on, enjoy and learn.

27 Outs

I last played organized baseball when I was slightly older than my son Jonah. I was 13 and in the 8th grade and it was in the local Babe Ruth league.  In the span of a year, I went from playing on a little league field to a major league field.  My growth spurt would not happen for some time whereas most of my teammates had grown exponentially in size and strength. Needless to say, I encountered a lot of difficulty and frustration.

Despite being in “retirement” from baseball for nearly 30 years, baseball remains one of the great loves of my life.  I love everything about it – the way the bat feels when you hit the ball hard on the sweet spot, the sound the dirt makes when you slide under a tag, the popping of a catcher’s glove from a hard fastball.  Baseball appeals to my intellectual curiosity as I love the strategy of game management. As a father and little league coach – the look of my children’s face when they get a hit or make a great catch.  And recently – watching Olivia, the only girl in our league, throw heat and strike out the side (as a side note, I enjoyed the look of shock and bewilderment on the face of the boys she struck out).

One of my favorite elements is the fact that unlike other sports, baseball games are not governed by the arbitrary nature of a clock.  To win a major league game, one team needs to get 27 outs.  And, even though a team may be down to the last strike of the last out, the game is not over until the last out is recorded.  So, in turn, that means that until the game is over, anything and everything is possible.

But more significantly, baseball permits a last strike, a last out comeback, particularly when it looks like the prospect for victory is all but extinct.

Given how baseball facilitates the comeback, one might assume this is the reason why I choose to write about baseball instead of something else (say track, a sport in which I competed for over 10 years). While that’s a big part of the reason, there is more to it that this one-dimensional view. Continue reading

Chris Ruisi-Feedback

Feedback: Every Leader Needs It

Most leaders “say” they want feedback. Yet, leaders today struggle with how to get others to provide it in an effective and constructive way.

Just in case you are wondering, no organization does the “feedback” thing perfectly. However, every company, including yours can do a better job at soliciting it and then deciding if and how to act on it.

Just because you’re in charge doesn’t mean you don’t want or need feedback from your team. If you are a trusted leader, they will willingly offer it in a professional and meaningful way. In fact, if you are a trusted leader, you are doing a good job of encouraging it. If you’re not sure how to ask, try this approach; ask periodically: Continue reading