Tag Archives: boosting team performance

Chris Ruisi Trusted Leader

Consistency: The Path to Becoming a Trusted Leader

It’s a known fact that consistency builds trust and trust is one of the key attributes a leader must have. Leaders need to demonstrate consistently to their teams that they can be trusted. When people trust someone, they tend to listen to that person and are willing to follow them.

Let’s look at five simple “consistent” actions a leader can take to build their trust factor: Continue reading

Chris Ruisi on Failure

Are You a Failure at Failure?

Failure is a fact of life. Failure happens. When it happens to you, you can lament about it and look to blame someone (other than you) or something. When you follow this approach, the next step is to throw up your hands in disgust and frustration, walk away and quit.

Or, you can make the conscious decision to take a step back, evaluate what happened and learn from the experience. And as you might suspect, this is the preferred action. In this regard, I stress a 4-step process that when things go wrong and you fail, you own it, fix it, learn from it and move on. And when you do fail, fail fast. I follow a simple rule: “Fail your failures fast,” so that you can get back on track and keep moving forward.

Taking a risk is the decision that sometimes leads to failure. To minimize the possibility of failure, learn to take calculated risks. Many of you have heard me say, “A turtle moves forward by sticking its neck out.” Continue reading

Leader Team Chris Ruisi

Stop Trying to Destroy Your Team

The single most important factor that will determine the success of your company is the quality of your team. Specifically, how you select, develop, utilize and measure them. To me, these four functions represent one of a leader’s key strategic responsibilities. Yet, many business leaders/entrepreneurs seem to go out of their way to self-sabotage their people efforts. How do they do this? Well, consider the following: Continue reading

Chris Ruisi-Feedback

Feedback: Every Leader Needs It

Most leaders “say” they want feedback. Yet, leaders today struggle with how to get others to provide it in an effective and constructive way.

Just in case you are wondering, no organization does the “feedback” thing perfectly. However, every company, including yours can do a better job at soliciting it and then deciding if and how to act on it.

Just because you’re in charge doesn’t mean you don’t want or need feedback from your team. If you are a trusted leader, they will willingly offer it in a professional and meaningful way. In fact, if you are a trusted leader, you are doing a good job of encouraging it. If you’re not sure how to ask, try this approach; ask periodically: Continue reading

Distractions Chris Ruisi

The Real Job of a Leader

When asked, “What is the job of a leader?” the standard response is to, “Get things done through other people.” Sounds simple, right? But there is much more that goes into getting things done through people. In fact, getting things done through other people is the result of what I believe is the real job of a leader.

The real job of a leader is to develop other people – their team – to successfully execute the vision they have set for their organization; whether it be a free-standing organization, a department within a larger firm or a small business. Simply stated, the job of a leader is to have the right people with the right skills in the right roles at the right time. Yet, despite its simplicity, developing people still does not get the attention it should on many so-called leaders’ radars. Continue reading

Failure to Communicate Chris Ruisi

Memo to the Boss

In my newest book – The Go-To Person’s Guide to Success – I go into great detail on how to manage your boss. That’s right: manage your boss. Here is an important takeaway from the book.

Managing the boss is best done openly, not subversively. Smart executives communicate to the boss what they are doing and why they are doing it. If you were writing a memo to the boss about why you were managing him, you would address these ten reasons why a boss should want to be managed by a direct report: Continue reading

Chris Ruisi Enemy is Us

You Want Them, and You Need Them

Every leader wants and needs to be trusted and be seen as credible by their team. Trust and credibility are equally important and go hand-in-hand in either making or breaking a leadership career. It’s been written that trust is built on credibility and credibility is earned by putting the interest of others ahead of yours.

Some mistakenly believe that they come with a “title” or are based on the size of your office. They are not given; they cannot be bought. They must be earned and then sustained, and this requires hard work on a consistent basis.

Consider practicing the following behaviors to help you either build or enhance your trust and credibility with your team. Continue reading

If the Student Hasn’t Learned, Maybe the Teacher Hasn’t Taught

I am constantly running into leaders and entrepreneurs who lament about the same challenge. Namely, their team’s performance is either not in sync with or not sufficient enough to help them make their vision a reality. I have even coached some of these “team challenged” folks. Some never got it and have gone elsewhere to seek fame. Others have gotten it and are achieving success.

As you drill down into their challenge it becomes apparent that some have only scratched the surface teaching their team specifically how their individual performance connects with and drives their vision. Even worse, some do nothing to help their team make the connection. Hence, the title of this morning’s Wake-up Call. Continue reading

Are You Developing Your Team?

Almost daily, we read that with our improving economy and full employment, there are more open jobs than there are people to fill them. Hence, the retention of your best performers becomes a key management concern and objective for 2019 and beyond.

One of the best ways I know to retain your talent is to continue to develop them, so they grow – and achieve personal satisfaction – as your company grows.

Chris Ruisi-Learning StoolNow, some of you may be saying, “Well, we train our employees.” Stop thinking about training your team and make the mental shift to those activities that will “develop” them. To me, when people talk about training, they are often describing an event or meeting. On the other hand, when you focus on development, you are taking a more permanent and longer perspective to help “develop” and use the right behaviors versus a one-time event or class.

There needs to be three key components when you want to effectively develop your team to produce at a higher level on a more consistent basis.

This visual of a 3-legged stool will help you in understanding how these concepts work.

 

Here’s further information to help you understand the three components necessary to make your development activities successful:

  1. In line with what I stated above, the good performer employee must be given the opportunity to learn or acquire the new skill or knowledge.
  2. Next, they must be given the opportunity to apply the new skill or knowledge to their current role. Get them using the new skill as soon as possible. Discuss how you will want them to apply it even before they acquire it to help them focus on the goal you have set for them.
  3. Finally, they must be given the opportunity to receive feedback – constructive and meaningful feedback – from you on how they are doing in applying that new skill or knowledge. Providing your team member with the right feedback will help them learn their new skill faster and give them more self-confidence.

I cannot think of a legitimate reason why you wouldn’t follow this approach. Unless of course, you prefer mediocrity and disengaged employees.